Tag Archives: Joanna Trollope

Jo Baker, “Longbourn”

So how do you feel about all of these Jane Austen knockoffs? I was underwhelmed by Death Comes to Pemberley and won’t have anything to do with mashups and vampires. I  have been anticipating Joanna Trollope’s update on Sense and Sensibility with … Continue reading

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Joanna Trollope, “The Soldier’s Wife”

I always enjoy Joanna Trollope’s books, though I can’t usually tell them apart retrospectively. Is that a bad thing? It didn’t used to be. I imagine Trollope’s heyday featured legions of female readers — of a certain age, naturally — … Continue reading

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Joanna Trollope, “Daughters-in-Law”

Did I dream this? Wasn’t there a moment when Joanna Trollope’s books were best-sellers in the U.S.? I’ve certainly bought most of them, loaned them to friends, re-read them, enjoyed them mightily. So I was startled to find that Daughters-in-Law … Continue reading

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Julia Glass, “The Widower’s Tale”

Near the end of The Widower’s Tale, in a segment narrated by the widower of the title, he says, “I have always been an avid and fairly ecumenical reader of fiction: I relish the pretend, the invented, the convincingly contrived.” … Continue reading

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Katharine Davis, “A Slender Thread”

It’s a pretty good recipe for a novel: take a group of attractive characters, subject them to a new kind of pressure, and see what happens. Joanna Trollope has been writing versions of this book for years, and Julia Glass … Continue reading

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Joanna Trollope, “The Other Family”

You could say that Joanna Trollope writes the same book over and over again. (I exclude here the historical romances she writes as Caroline Harvey, which are very good of their kind.) You could complain about how they are always … Continue reading

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Katharine Davis, “Capturing Paris”

Spend a few hours in Paris without a plane ticket. Continue reading

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